Fence posts in Christchurch Red Zone recycled for community projects

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Old red zone fence posts have been turned into artwork and mushroom signage at Fungi Farm in Richmond.

Will Harvie / Stuff

Old red zone fence posts have been turned into artwork and mushroom signage at Fungi Farm in Richmond.

Old fence posts in Christchurch’s residential red zone are recycled into funky artwork, compost bins and fruit trees for a local school.

“This is a good use of the resources that we have paid with our taxes,” said Hayley Guglietta of the Avon-Ōtākaro (AvON) Network.

Christchurch City Council and AvON were removing approximately 14 kilometers of internal fencing in the red zone to make public land more accessible, council residential red zone manager Brenden Winder said.

The board had cut most of the posts processed and was using them for its own purposes.

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AvON also pulled “hundreds” of them and used them for community projects, Guglietta said. They hadn’t bothered to count how many.

On Monday, Matty Cook, of the Avebury House Men’s Shed, was working on how to assemble low trees for a fruit forest that had been planted at Te Pā o RākaihautÅ«, a designated character school on the site of the old Linwood intermediate.

It was hoped that the surroundings would protect the roots of the new trees.

Meanwhile, across from Avebury House in Richmond, poles were being recycled into works of art at the Mushroom farm, An education, play and food area on the theme of mushrooms.

Matty Cook, from the Avebury House men's shed, recycles the poles into compost bins and fruit trees.

Will Harvie / Stuff

Matty Cook, from the Avebury House men’s shed, recycles the poles into compost bins and fruit trees.

The poles were wrapped in rope, fitted with woven caps, and some had talking tubes that carried voices to other poles a few feet away.

AvON calls the recycling effort the White Post Project, after an earlier effort to mark access points in the red zone.

Some pedestrian entrances were created when the government fenced off the red zone after the 2011 earthquakes, but they were poorly signposted.

The main organizer of the red zone, Hayley Guglietta.

CHRIS SKELTON / Tips

The main organizer of the red zone, Hayley Guglietta.

AvON painted the entrance posts white to make them easier to find, Guglietta said.

Most of the outer limits of the red zones would remain fenced to prevent vehicles, dumpsters and the like from entering the property. These remaining fences usually run along the main roads.

The council did not know the value of the fences installed, but old 2.4 meter sieve poles taken from a vineyard in Harewood had a buy now for $ 25 each on Trade Me.


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